Consolidated Canso

Consolidated Canso

DND archives

A Consolidated Canso belonging to 162 Squadron, RCAF, photographed in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in 1943. This is the aircraft that Flight Lieutenant David Hornell was flying when he and his crew were shot down on June 24, 1944; he was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his heroism following the crash.PMR77-147

Overview

Overview

The Consolidated Catalina and Canso were close cousins. The Canso was the true amphibious version of the design and therefore included a conventional undercarriage to allow for either water or land use. The Canso provided more than two decades of valuable service to the RCAF. The Catalina variant came first and was produced beginning in 1935 for the United States Navy. The amphibious version, designated PBY-5A, came in service early in 1941 and the RCAF began using the aircraft on anti-submarine patrols that same year. After the Second World War, the RCAF used Cansos for search and rescue, Arctic survey missions and various transport operations.

Designation PBY-5A    
Model number 28-5A
Role Patrol
Taken on strength 1941
Struck off strength 1962
Number 224
Service RCAF

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

Technical specifications

Technical specifications (PBY-5A)

Manufacturer Consolidated; also license-built by Boeing (Canada) Ltd
Crew / passengers Crew of eight or nine
Powerplant Two 1,200 hp (895 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92 Twin Wasp radials
Maximum speed 175 mph (282 km/h)
Cruising speed 113 mph (182 km/h)
Service ceiling 13,000 ft (3,960 m)
Range 2,350 mi (3,782 km)
Empty weight 20,910 lbs (9,485 kg)
Maximum weight on take-off 5,420 lbs (16,067 kg)
Span 104 ft (31.7 m)
Length 63 ft 10 in (19.47 m)
Height 20 ft 2 in (6.15 m)
Wing area 1,400 sq ft (130 m2)
Armament One 0.5 in (12.7 mm) machine gun in each blister, one or two 0.3 in (7.62 mm) machine guns in bow turret and one 0.3 in (7.62 mm) machine gun in rear ventral hatch. Provisions for up 1,000 lbs (454 kg) in bombs or depth charges
Cost Unknown

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

24,200 ft (7,376 m)
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