Curtiss JN-4 Canuck

JN-4 Canuck

A view of a restored museum example of the JN-4 Canuck in original Royal Flying Corps training colours. PHOTO: DND

Overview

Overview

During the First World War, the Royal Flying Corps began setting up flying schools in Canada starting in 1916. The Royal Flying Corps selected the Curtiss JN‑3 Jenny as the training aircraft of choice. The type was then manufactured in Canada under license by Canadian Aeroplanes Limited, and the Canadian version was given the designation JN‑4 Canuck. The Canuck went on to become numerically the most important trainer of Canadian and British pilots and the design lent itself to a wide variety of training purposes, including air‑to‑air gunnery, photography and wireless radio training. Royal Flying Corps training schools in both Canada and the United States of America used the aircraft extensively. After the war, numerous JN‑4 Canucks made their way into civilian use. The Canadian government received over 50 JN‑4 aircraft as part of a post-war Imperial gift, but only 10 of these aircraft saw active use in the Canadian Air Force of the 1920s.

Model Number JN‑4
Role Trainer
Taken on strength 1917
Struck off strength 1924
Number 2,320
Service Royal Flying Corps / Canadian Air Force

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications

 

Manufacturer Canadian Aeroplanes Ltd.
Crew / passengers Two pilots in tandem or one pilot plus one passenger
Powerplant One 90 hp Curtiss OX‑2 or OX‑5 piston engine
Maximum speed 74 mph (121 km/h)
Cruising speed 60 mph (96.5 km/h)
Service ceiling 11,000 ft (3,353 m)  
Empty weight 1,390 lb (631 kg)
Gross weight 1,920 lb (872 kg)
Upper span 43 ft 7 in (13.29 m)
Lower span 34 ft 8 in (10.57 m)
Length 27 ft 3 in (8.29 m)
Height 9 ft 11 in (3.02 m)
Wing area 361 sq ft (33.5 m2)
Armament Provision for forward firing Vickers machine gun or flexible Scharff-ring mounted machine gun in rear cockpit
Cost $5,465 US

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

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