Fairey Battle

An undated photo of a Fairey Battle. PHOTO: DND Archives, PCN-5245

A view of a restored museum example of the JN-4 Canuck in original Royal Flying Corps training colours. PHOTO: DND

Overview

Overview

First flown in March 1936, the Fairey Battle was operationally obsolete by 1939 when it was to see active service as a front line combat aircraft. Following a gallant but hopeless exposure in France at the beginning of the war, the type was relegated to training duties, in which it contributed far more to war effort than it had as an operational asset. The Royal Canadian Air Force had received its first Battles in August 1939 when eight were shipped by rail to Camp Borden in Ontario. More were sent from England and large numbers were eventually to be employed as dual control trainers, target tugs and gunnery trainers in the many bombing and gunnery schools of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. With the introduction of Bolingbrokes and Harvards, the numbers of Battles in RCAF use declined, but they still continued in service until the end of hostilities. Nos.111 and 122 Squadrons of the RCAF also flew Battles.

Marks Mk I, IT, IIT
Role Trainer
Taken on strength 1939
Struck off strength 1946
Number 740
Service RCAF

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications (Mark I)

 

Manufacturer Fairey Aircraft
Crew / passengers Crew of three
Powerplant One 1,030 hp (768 kilowatt) Rolls Royce Merlin engine
Maximum speed 257 mph (414 km/h)
Cruising speed 210 mpg (338 km/h)
Service ceiling 25,000 ft (7,620 m)
Range 1,000 mi (1,609 km)
Empty weight 6,647 lb (3,015 kg)
Maximum take‑off weight  10,792 lb (4,895 kg)
Span 54 ft (16.46 m) 
Length 42 ft 4 in (12.9 m)
Height 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)
Wing area 422 sq ft (39.20 m2)
Armament One .303 in (7.7 mm) machine gun in starboard wing and one Vickers “K” gun in rear cockpit plus provisions for up 1,000 lb (454 kg) of bombs
Cost Unknown

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

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