North American Harvard

North American Harvard

North American Harvard

Overview

Overview

The North American Harvard is another famous and highly successful design.  Also known by a wide variety of other names (Harvard, Texan, Yellow Peril) or designations (AT-6, T-6, etc), the aircraft was heavily used by the Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force during the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan in the Second World War and subsequently for NATO pilot training in the post-war era. Approximately 11,000 Canadians and 8,000 Allied airmen received pilot training on Harvards in Canada during the Second World War. The aircraft could also be modified as an armament trainer capable of carrying either machine guns, rockets or practice bombs.

Designation  
Model Number NA-66/76, T-6
Marks Mk I, IIA, IIB, III, IV
Role Trainer
Taken on strength 1939
Struck off strength 1965
Number 2,258
Service RCAF / Royal Canadian Navy

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications (Mk IV)

 

Manufacturer Canadian Car & Foundry Ltd under license from North American Aircraft
Crew / passengers Two pilots
Powerplant One 600 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN-1 Wasp radial engine
Maximum speed 180 miles per hour (290 kilometres per hour) 
Cruising speed 140 miles per hour (225 kilometres per hour)
Service ceiling 22,400 feet (6,827 metres)
Range 750 miles (1,207 kilometres)
Empty weight 3,995 pounds (1,814 kilograms)
Gross weight 5,235 pounds (2,376 kilograms)
Span 42 feet (12.81 metres)
Length 28 feet 11 inches (8.8 metres)
Height 11 feet 8.5 inches (3.55 metres)
Wing area 253.7 square feet (23.57 square metres)
Armament Provision for machine guns, rockets and practice bombs
Cost $27,000 USD

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

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